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Circle Groups

The mission of Circle Groups is to promote resiliency in children and youth, families, adults, and communities by offering circle program models that create, restore, and sustain healthy relationships. One Circle Foundation recognizes that healthy relationships are the core element to a healthy individual, family, society, and world.

Girls Circle

Girls Circle groups foster self-esteem, and help girls maintain authentic connections with peers and adult women in their community. A strengths-based, skill building approach creates a safe space for girls to address risky behaviors, build on protective factors, and improve relationships in a format that interests and engages girls. During this time, girls take turns talking and listening to each other about their concerns and interests. The girls can express themselves further through creative or focused activities, such as role playing, drama, journaling, poetry, and drawing.

Boys Council

The Boys Council meets a core developmental need in boys for strong, positive relationships. In this structured environment, boys and young men gain the vital opportunity to address masculine definitions and behaviors and build their capacities to find their innate value and create good lives, individually and collectively. The Council aims to promote boys’ natural strengths and to increase their options about being male in today’s world. The Council challenges myths about how to be a “real boy” or “real man”. It engages boys in activities, dialogue, and self-expression to question stereotypical concepts and to increase boys’ emotional, social, and cultural literacy by promoting valuable relationships with peers and adult facilitators.

Women’s Circle

Women's Circle allows women to share, explore, build skills, and encourage one another to live authentically in mind, body, heart, and spirit. When a woman’s strength is affirmed and strengthened in a caring circle, she will gain esteem, confidence and power to live according to her true values. By participating in meaningful, gender-relevant discussions and capacity building activities, women reinforce their vital roles within the community and society. Women grow through and toward relationships as they share diverse strengths and capabilities that shape their lives and their communities. Through discussions and creative arts activities, women address and build skills in the areas of relationships, self-care, clarifying purpose, goal setting, money, conflicts, skills in work and professional life, and more.


Love146 Not A #Number

SHFL is committed to educating youth who are at risk for child trafficking and exploitation about warning signs, dangers and what to do if they find themselves in that situation.

The Curriculum

Not a #Number is an interactive, five-module prevention curriculum designed to teach youth how to protect themselves from human trafficking and exploitation through information, critical thinking, and skill development. Not a #Number uses a holistic approach focusing on respect, empathy, individual strengths, and the relationship between personal and societal pressures that create or increase vulnerabilities.

Effective prevention often starts by raising awareness of harmful stereotypes and attitudes that create vulnerabilities and keep youth from seeking help.

Through open conversations, engaging activities, the use of media, and opportunities for self-disclosure, participants will:

  • Raise their awareness of what constitutes human trafficking and exploitation.
  • Learn how to recognize recruitment tactics and understand vulnerabilities.
  • Challenge harmful stereotypes and societal attitudes.
  • Identify healthy support systems.
  • Develop skills to safely navigate potential and existing exploitative situations.
  • Learn how to access community resources when situations occur that increase their vulnerability (or if exploitation is already underway).

Where and How is it Taught

Not a #Number is relevant for many different communities and populations. It has been taught in schools, child welfare and juvenile justice agencies. The curriculum fits well into health education and life skills programs and more historical lessons that address modern violence and social movements. It can also be used in after-school programs alongside psycho-educational and therapeutic services.

Target Audience for Not a #Number

  • Youth ages 12-18
  • Youth of all genders including youth that identify as LGBTQ
  • Youth of all ethnicities and backgrounds
  • Youth with high risk indicators such as low socioeconomic status, history of abuse and/or neglect, exposure to violence, risky offline and online sexual behavior or history of alcohol/substance abuse among other factors
  • Youth at risk of trafficking or who have experienced trafficking.

Learn more about Love146


PREA Services

We with our local jails on adherence to PREA (Prison Rape Elimination Act) standards and provide support groups and one-on-one counseling to incarcerated individuals who identify as victims of sexual assault and/or domestic violence prior to their incarceration. Additionally, we provide confidential rape crisis services to incarcerated individuals who have been sexually assaulted while in jail.


Yates Community Child Interview Room

This room provides a safe, confidential, child-friendly space for interviewing child physical and/or sexual abuse victims. The space is available to law enforcement and child protective services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The camera equipment allows for one trained interviewer to speak with the child in the interview room, while others involved with the case (law enforcement, child protective services, DA’s office) watch the interview from another room and communicate with the interviewer via a hidden earpiece to make sure that all necessary questions are asked. Because one single interview minimizes additional trauma to the child, this is considered best-practice interviewing of abused and neglected children. This is the only room of its kind in Yates County and is available to other agencies in need, whether or not they reside in Yates County.


Enough is Enough College Liaison

In 2015, New York State signed in to law the Enough is Enough legislation, which required colleges and universities to take aggressive steps towards ending sexual assault on their campuses. In 2016, Safe Harbors created the position of College Liaison to collaborate with area colleges and universities in both the prevention of sexual violence and the provision of resources to college survivors.

Our College Liaison works with five institutions: Keuka College, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Finger Lakes Community College, New York Chiropractic College, and Finger Lakes Health College of Nursing. On all of these campuses, the role of the College Liaison is two-fold; they facilitate and lead prevention and training sessions on topics such as bystander intervention, healthy relationships, and consent while also serving as a crisis advocate for students in the aftermath of a sexual assault or interpersonal violence.


Yates County Victim/Witness Coordinator

Our victim/witness coordinator is housed in the Yates County District Attorney’s office. This staff person provides support throughout the criminal justice process for all victims of violation, misdemeanor, and felony crimes. She provides updates on court proceedings, assistance with OVS compensation claims, advocacy with the District Attorney and local law enforcement, accompaniment to court, and one on one crisis counseling.